Motocross Hideout

The Public Hiding Spot For Dirt Bikers

How To Make Your Clutch Last Longer – Quick Tip

“Budget” and dirt bike riding usually don’t go hand-in-hand, but there are many ways to make it more affordable. This tip is something so simple that will make your clutch last longer. You may already do it some of the time without even knowing it, but you may be able to improve upon it. It is a problem that I see quite often (I see a lot of guys/gals on street bikes doing it as well).

By now you’re probably thinking, just tell me what it is! Okay, I don’t like reading much either so I won’t waste time. When you come to a stop, put the bike in neutral and let out the clutch if you are going to idle for a period of time. That’s right, all you have to do is remember to keep the transmission in neutral with the clutch engaged (lever released/out).

If you’re still reading this, you may be wondering, “But why?” That is a valid question, so let me explain. When you pull in the clutch, even when the lever is all the way to the handlebar, the clutch fibers and friction plates are still spinning against each other ever so slightly. Even at idle, the friction of the plates rubbing will cause them to heat up. This will result in them warping over a shorter time period if you regularly do this on rides.

Dirt Bike Clutch

Dirt Bike Clutch

So, how do I know when and where to change this habit? Simple; if you come to a stop and know you’re going to sit there for more than a couple seconds, shift it in to neutral. You may forget to do this more often that not at first, but if you make a habit of it, it will become just that.

I hope this quick tip helps. Free free to post a comment, question, or a suggestion.

-Tom Stark

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AFX FX-39DS Supermoto Helmet & Shield – Review

Looking for a budget supermoto helmet that will turn heads, yet be stealthy at the same time? Yes, I know that sounds like a contradiction, but that is what I was going for when I decided to buy this AFX FX-39 Dual Sport helmet. I already had street and dirt bike helmets, but none of them would cut it, in my opinion, for supermoto duty. I needed an entirely different helmet for this kind of riding. What do I do when riding my street legal supermoto? Pure hooliganism. These bikes aren’t meant to go fast, so I don’t need a high-tech aerodynamic motorcycle helmet, and a dirt bike helmet with goggles for eye protection just doesn’t work for me.

Fit

I would say that I have a pretty average or round-shaped head and this helmet fits well. I normally wear a size medium, which is what my FX-39DS is, and would say that it fits true to size. The chin-strap, unlike a D-ring style, is easy to adjust and works great. It’s a ‘set it and forget it’ feature that’s very easy to clip in and out of, and it has yet to come loose while riding. However, the end of the adjustment strap has nowhere to go but flop around while riding. It is annoying if I don’t tuck it into my jacket or helmet.

Comfort

A helmet that fits properly is more than likely going to be comfortable because… well, it just fits! This AFX lid is no different. The cheek pads and lining are soft, and form well to my face without any noticeable pressure points. I haven’t done any day-long rides because I don’t tour with my supermoto, but I have ridden for a couple hours in an evening and didn’t have any discomfort.

Noise

If there’s one major thing I don’t like about this helmet, it would be the wind noise. Yes, it’s pretty loud, especially with a naked supermoto (no fairing). But, that’s not that big of a deal for me since I wear ear plugs.

Ventilation

Riding up into the high 80s and lower 90s (Fahrenheit) my head didn’t have any problem staying cool. It has a vent on the chin bar, which, in my honest opinion doesn’t do much since air is already coming up underneath the helmet. It also has vents for the forehead, on the top, and the rear for letting hot air out. I do not live in an extremely hot climate, but I would imagine it can cope as well as any other full face helmet with all the ventilation.

Function

FX39-DS Helmet w/ Silver Mirror Shield

FX39-DS Helmet w/ Silver Mirror Shield

I previously mentioned that the new chin-strap retention system functions very well for quick fitting and removal. The shield works well and stays in place. It would be nice if it retracted a little bit higher, but that is a minor complaint. The only time I flip it up is occasionally when I stop. As far as vision goes, some people complained about distorted vision due to the extreme curvature of the shield compared to a standard motorcycle helmet shield. Most, if not all, of those people said that they got used to it after wearing it for some time. I did not have this problem, even from the beginning.

I am using the Mirrored Silver face shield with the FX39 that I bought as an accessory. After I figured out how to swap the shields it was pretty easy and can be done in about a minute or less. I didn’t realize that the new shield came with its own components so I don’t have to swap them out from the original shield.

Quality

For as cheap as this helmet is, the quality is really pretty good. I have only used it for one season, but nothing has broken or fallen apart like some of the motorcycle helmets have that I own. My AFX FX39DS is flat black, and the paint looks great. It looks similar in quality to $300+ helmets in its category. I have nothing to complain about in the quality department.

Style

Other than the price tag, the styling was probably the biggest reason why I bought this helmet. It looks like some of the most expensive dual sport helmets while keeping the price low for us “budget-minded” riders. Combined with the mirrored silver shield, the FX39 looks straight-up “Boss”. I looked at other dual sport helmets in this price range, and some of them I would not even want to wear because they look hideous.

Safety

Last, but certainly not least, are the safety ratings. The AFX 39 dual sport helmet is DOT and ECE-22.05 certified in all sizes except 3XL and 4XL(which are only DOT rated). DOT is the rating that is commonly used in the United States, while the ECE standards are based in Europe and are used in over 50 countries across the globe.

Pros:

  • Looks great
  • Very affordable
  • Comfortable
  • New chin-strap feature is easy to use
  • Vision is nice and wide
  • DOT and ECE certified
  • High quality for its price-point

Cons:

  • Noisy
  • Loose chin-strap end flops around
  • Shield doesn’t fully retract

 

I will continue to use this helmet for my supermotard riding days because it fits well, looks awesome, and protects my noggin. Maybe some day I will upgrade to an almighty Arai or Shoei Dual Sport helmet, but right now I’ll stick to my Bang-For-Buck gear.

Click Here To Buy My AFX FX39DS Helmet!

-Tom Stark

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Pre-Ride Checklist – 11 Things To Inspect On Your Dirt Bike

A broken dirt bike sitting in my garage is not a happy sight. What’s even worse is when I haul my dirt bike out to the track or trails and it breaks down shortly after my riding session begins. There will always be those kind of days sooner or later, but I have learned how to prevent most mechanical gremlins from occurring just from experience over the years.’

I started taking maintenance seriously when I had an incident that fried a top-end when it probably could have been prevented if I had only checked the coolant level prior to riding. I have now taken the time to figure out a maintenance routine that will keep my bike running better and longer. This list of items to check are the most common things that break or cause a bike failure.

  • Oil/oil filter:

First thing to do is check the oil level and cleanliness. Running out of oil will not only end your day, but also result in a major engine failure. Some dirt bikes have a sight glass on the side of the crankcase to check the oil level, while other bikes require you to check the dipstick. Certain bikes may also require the engine to idle for a minute to circulate the oil before checking it. Always remember to check the oil level with the bike standing straight up in order to get an accurate reading. If you have a four-stroke dirt bike with an oil filter, replace it (or properly clean it if re-usable) every 1-2 oil changes.

  • Air Filter

The next common part to cause problems is the air filter. A dirty air filter can make the bike run rough due to lack of air-flow. A dirty filter will also allow dirt to get past it and into the engine. Having a clean air filter will prolong engine life. Foam only lasts so longer until it starts to degrade and literally fall apart. Strong cleaning chemicals, such as gas, will speed up this process. While filters are meant to be cleaned and reused, do not reuse one if it has any rips, damage, or if you can easily pull chunks out of it.

  • Fresh Gas

A low-performance engine, such as an air-cooled four-stroke, may not be finicky with the gas you run through it. However, old gas will eventually cause problems because it degrades with age and will gum up in the carburetor or throttle body. If you run race gas or mixed gas in a motocross bike, I suggest using it all within a week or two, if not the same day. The longer it sits out, the more it degrades. I have personally had complications using mixed race that was several weeks old; the result was me rebuilding the top-end on my 125cc 2-stroke. If your bike is not running right compared to the last time you rode, there’s a good chance that the gas is either bad, or the carburetor is dirty because it has sat for too long.

  • Spark Plug

There’s three things that an engine needs in order to run; air, fuel, and spark. Once you confirm that it’s getting air and fuel, the next thing to check is the spark plug. First of all, are you getting spark? If yes, then inspect the spark to see if it’s black and/or wet. If yes, then the plug started to or has already fouled. A proper color to see on the tip of a spark plug is tan or light brown. This means that the air-to-fuel ratio is correct. However, gas these days can be pretty lousy with all the additives and give you inaccurate readings. For more information on testing spark, read This Article on Diagnosing a No-Start.

  • Tire Pressure

Have you ever been on a ride and felt the front-end get a really mushy feeling? Sort of like a…. flat tire!? Getting a flat stinks, and it’s even less fun to change it on a dirt bike rim. Always check the air pressure of both tires before riding. The pressure will change with temperature as well, so you may need to add, or even reduce the pressure throughout the day.

Well maintained dirt bikes last a lot longer.

Well maintained dirt bikes last a lot longer.

  • Coolant

If you have an air-cooled engine, you lucked out on this one (the disadvantage is lower performance, but that may not be a necessity anyway). Before starting your bike, pop the radiator cap off and look to see if the coolant level is at or near the top. If you need to tip the bike over far to see it, you may want to figure out why the coolant is low before riding. If it was full on the previous ride and now it’s noticeably lower, it’s probably because the engine started to overheat. It could be a minor problem caused by riding too slow for too long. If you’re continuously losing coolant then you have bigger problems.

  • Chain

A properly adjusted and clean chain will ride smoother and last a lot longer. Signs that the chain needs to be replaced are: kinks, excessive wear or side-to-side play, rust, or stretched beyond the length of the adjusters. You can remove links and continue adjusting it, but there is a much higher risk of snapping a link if it is stretched that far. It’s good insurance to bring a couple spare master links with you in case you do have a mishap. You’ll need a chain-breaker as well.

  • Loose Bolts

This is often overlooked by riders due to lack of experience or just plain ignorance. Some bikes vibrate more than others, and bolts can and will come loose overtime. Loose triple clamp, subframe, or engine mount bolts may break or fall out and cause a catastrophe if you have a hard impact. It may result in broken parts, and quite possibly a bodily injury if it causes a crash. You shouldn’t need to check every single bolt for every riding occasion, but you should make a routine habit of checking all of the critical bolts and torquing them to spec every 5-10 hours of ride time. If you put a lot of hours on a dirt bike, you will start to get the feel for how long things last and when certain parts or bolts need attention.

  • Brake Pads

The faster you ride, the faster you will need to stop in order to turn or dodge an upcoming obstacle, such as a tree. A quick peak at the life of the pads can prevent an accident such as this from happening. If the pad is almost to the end of the wear bar or metal then it’s time to replace them. It’s a fairly simple job on most dirt bikes if you follow the manual. Yes, I know that if you are a guy then you probably don’t want to read instructions, but an OEM manual is a very valuable tool to have if you want to save money by wrenching on your bike(s) at home.

  • Spokes

When is the last time you have checked the tension of the spokes on your set of wheels? If you can’t remember then now is a the time to check. If any of them feel loose, tighten them until they are snug. Spoke wrenches come in many sizes for all of the different sized spokes to make the job easy. Just don’t go too far when wrenching or else the spoke will pop the tube.

  • Controls

Last, but not least, you should test and make sure all of the controls are properly functioning. Is there proper play in the clutch lever (1/8″ to 1/4″ of travel at the end of the lever)? Are the front and rear brake strong; meaning they don’t have a spongy feeling? If they feel like mush or are weak and the brake pads are good then you should bleed them to get any air out that could be in the system. This is assuming that both brakes are hydraulic. If you have drum brakes, check the tension/play in them and adjust if necessary for optimum braking performance.

Any cables that are starting to feel stiff should be lubed. Check for any fraying in the line. If any visible damage, it’s best to replace right away or else it may break when you’re 20 miles into a trail ride. As for hydraulic brake (or clutch) lines, inspect for any rips or tears in the hose. If it’s leaking at the master cylinder or caliper, there’s a good chance that the crush washer or banjo bolt has failed. Do one thing at a time when attempting to fix a part or you will get in over your head in a hurry.

While virtually any part can fail, a regular inspection and servicing of all the items on this list will give you a much better chance of riding all day without a bike problem. Preventative maintenance may not always be fun, but 30-60 minutes of scrutinizing your bike beats losing a whole or even half a day of riding. Just remember that an OEM manual is your friend. Whenever you are wrenching, always check your bike’s specific manual for proper torque and adjustment specs.

Now, GET TO IT, and ride safe!

-Tom Stark

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