KX250F & RMZ250 2004

2004 Kawasaki & Suzuki 250F

2004 RMZ250

If you’re looking at getting an older 250f, and possibly a Kawasaki or Suzuki, then you should probably consider some of this info. When these companies made their 250f, it was more like a Kawazuki 250f, because Kawasaki and Suzuki had partnered up. So most of the parts on these bikes are interchangeable. This was their first year making the 250f, so just by that you should be a little worried.

2004 KX250F

As some might expect, these bikes were not the greatest reliability-wise in 2004. Although they were fast bikes, they had an overheating problem caused by a bad/weak water-pump. Another defect these bikes had was in the valve-train that caused the valves to burn-up more quickly. These problems can get bad and scared me away from buying one of these bikes. This is not to say that these bikes do not perform. They have plenty of power, and if you really want to get one then I suggest you get a newer style complete cylinder head and get and aftermarket water-pump and impeller to fix the overheating problem. If you do that then the bike should be fine, but by the time you spend all that money on parts you could have bought a newer bike more than likely. Good luck, and remember that no matter what you ride, have fun and stay safe! Thanks

-Tom Stark

 

How To Sell A Dirt Bike

How to sell a dirt bike or motorcycle

Almost every single dirt bike or motorcycle ad I see has at least a couple defects in it. This makes it more difficult to sell a bike, especially in this poor economy. So if you want some tips on how to make your ads more professional and how to sell a bike more quickly, listen up!

Making a bike look good:

People will be a lot more interested in your bike if it looks nice. That’s starting with making your bike clean. I always spray my bike with soap and water, then I scrub everywhere I can get to with a tooth brush. Taking the plastics off makes it easier and you can get into a lot more spots that you couldn’t before. If you don’t mind spending a little bit of money on New Plastics and/or graphics, then I highly suggest doing it. It will allow you to sell the bike quicker and you might get your money back doing it. It makes the bike look really nice and fresh because not everything is scratched up anymore. Make sure you don’t go overboard on replacing or refurbishing parts, such as repainting the frame, case covers, etc. along with plastic and graphics to make it literally look new, otherwise buyers might think there is something suspicious and get scared away. Make sure not to just clean it before someone comes to look at it, but also for the pictures, because it’s not very inviting to look at a bike that is dirty in the ad.

Pictures:

Pictures is an absolute must if you want to sell a bike. People don’t want to travel far without seeing a bike and find out that it’s an absolute wreck. I suggest that you post at least one or two pictures of your bike/item.

 

Title:

One of the first things you want is a good title, which isn’t very difficult, but I have seen quite a few ads that are titled, “Dirt bike for sale.” Now that may be true, but does that say much about what it is? Not really, and not many people are going to click on it if they just say that. So if you want a good title, make sure you have most if not all of the model info. For example, a good and simple title is. “(Year of bike) (Make of bike) (Model name).” It’s that simple. Here is a title that I have for one of my dirt bikes, “2001 Yamaha YZ125.” It’s really that easy.

Description:

This is where I see the most mistakes or defects in peoples ads. Anything from spelling, grammar, to too much detail and too long. To have a professional looking ad you want to write just enough info for people to see so they don’t contact you asking a million questions. All you have to write is a little bit about the bike, such as a sentence or two about its history, what’s been done to the bike, what aftermarket parts it has, and anything else that a buyer should know.

Price

The price is one of the most crucial pieces to selling a bike. Many sellers think their bikes are worth gold because they have thousands in aftermarket parts, or that they just put two grand into rebuilding it. Aftermarket parts add next to no value to bikes. In fact, some people would rather buy a stock bike, so if you have stock parts, I would suggest you put them back on and keep the aftermarket parts, or just sell them with them off of the bike. Just because you put 1500 into rebuilding the engine does not mean it’s worth that much more, it means that they blew the bike up and other parts will probably need replacing soon. Rebuilds DO NOT add to value because they are just maintenance. Now for figuring out your price, it depends on the model, year, and what kind of shape the bike is in. If it’s in good shape then take a look at other ads people are posting. Usually they are asking 10-25% more than the bike is worth, so I suggest you post it for a little less than the average.

Replying to buyers:

First of all, if you are using Craigslist and are not going to check your email every day or two, then please put a phone number so someone can reach you!!! I see hundreds of ads that do not have a phone number, so I have to wait for them to reply on email, that is if they reply at all. If you do check your email every day then you should be good, but I would still say that a phone number is a must.

Selling the bike

When a buyer arrives, make sure you are kind to them and do not get upset or have an unusual behavior at all. Probably the number one rule I use when selling bikes is “being honest.” You have to tell the truth and not hide anything to the seller so that they won’t come back to you after buying the bike complaining about something you lied about. It is much easier for everyone if you’re out front with everything about the bike, that way you can be confident in selling your bike. Also make sure that the buyer knows that this is an as-is sale, and if something happens to the bike there is no warranty if it’s a used bike. If you happen to sell it you will either want to give the seller the title or make a bill of sale telling who bought it, who sold it, what the price was, VIN # of bike, name, number, so that nothing will come back it you if it’s stolen or something.

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reply. Thanks for viewing, and good luck selling your bike!

-Tom Stark

 

 

Dirt Bike Trails Protection


Dirt bike trails can be a lot of fun for any rider, but whats not fun is your bike getting damaged, or even worse, you getting injured. That is why there are many options and add-ons to protect you and your bike. Any rider that has hit a tree or another similar object while blitzing through dirt bike trails would have to agree that it hurts and they wouldn’t want to do it again (Unless of course you are on the show “Jesse James Is A Dead Man” and one of you ‘deadly’ stunts is riding a dirt bike over an off-road course). Anyway, protecting you and your dirt bike for riding on trails can save you some big money, especially if you “accidentally” tip over a lot. Don’t worry, these tips will help keep your bike in better shape in the end, and yourself as well if you choose to listen to me.

Protective Gear (For You)

BJ22 Ballistic Jersey
EVS Body Armor

The first thing to do before you go trail riding on your dirt bike is to buy protection gear for your body. Your bike may be expensive, but it’s much more beneficial if you save your own butt rather than the dirt bike. Remember, the bike is replaceable, you are not. At least not in this life you aren’t. The basic protective gear is obviously a DOT approved off-road helmet, a good pair of motocross boots, and some long clothes. Now to really protect yourself from all of those trees, rocks, roots, and other hard objects that you would hit when or if you fall on the trails, good body armor is the best protection you can get. Some people may say that they are very uncomfortable to wear, they are itchy and hot, or they’re just plain annoying to wear while riding. Most of those people probably have never even tried using one while trail riding, let alone even trying one on.

Body armor/suits are good for any kind of riding because they are full upper-body protection and many come with kidney belts that help prevent too much back stress, which is somewhat common when riding on dirt bike trails because you sit down a lot. I use one when I go racing, trail riding, and when I ride my dirt bikes with friends, and I don’t really have anything to complain about. I use a BJ22 Ballistic Jersey and will say that it was a good investment. I won’t go into too much detail about it, but will say that it is awesome protection. It doesn’t bother me much and it’s not extremely bulky. Fortunately this body armor has good ventilation and is still usable in hotter conditions without making me die from sweat. This suit comes with chest protection, shoulder pads, elbow guards, back-plate protection, and a kidney belt. If you want to give your upper body a break when you wipe out or hit something, try putting on some armor; your body will like it.

RC2 Race Collar
EVS Race Collar

Another good protective piece of gear for trail riding is a neck brace/collar. This is another thing that is neglected, especially when riding on dirt bike trails. Most people that have one only use it when they ride on the track because that is usually the most dangerous type of riding. But if you are blazing through dirt bike trails there is a good chance of injuring your neck as well if you crash. I use an EVS Race Collar and am glad I got it (Click here for a review that I made for this neck collar). It can save a neck injury or collar bone if you fall and land on your head or if your bike hits you. I always ride with it on and will say that I never notice it. The only time it restricts the head is when you turn and try to look backwards, otherwise it’s great protection with good comfort. Trust me when I say these will pay for themselves probably after one bad crash.

Protective Gear (For Your Bike)

Once you get all of the necessary equipment for yourself then you can start protecting your precious bike. Probably the most important part to protect on a two stroke dirt bike for trail riding is the pipe. The head pipe/expansion chamber can easily get damaged if you crash, especially if it hits rocks or other hard objects. A simple way to keep it from getting badly dented or cracked is by buying a pipe guard. E-Line has Pipe Guards that will fit many two and four-stroke dirt bikes. These will make your pipe last much longer than without having one. It’s a cheaper alternative than buying another new pipe, and they hardly add any weight to the bike.

Hand guards are one of the most popular dirt bike modification for trail riding because they protect your hands from hitting annoying trees, weeds, branches, and other objects in the woods that would hurt your hands. Pro Taper makes many different Hand Guards for pretty much every off-road bike possible. They have many models with several colors to match your needs. If you want to protect your hands from roost and trees, you need some hand guards!

Devol Engineering makes Front Disc and Rear Disc Guards to protect your brake rotors from getting damaged or bent from hitting rocks and other stiff objects on the trails. This is a cheap way to keep your brake discs/rotors safer and cleaner.

Works Connection has Aluminum Skid Plates that will protect the underside of the engine and the frame. This is another common modification that trail riders do to their dirt bikes because logs and rocks can really do some damage to the under part of your bike. Stop the wreckage with a skid plate before it’s too late. They are light, easy to install, and don’t add bulk to your bike.

Radiator Guards can help prevent twisting and breaking of radiators that result in costly repairs or replacement. Works Connection also has Radiator Braces that will fit almost every name brand dirt bike with radiators out there. These Guards are a lot cheaper than buying new radiators and will increase the longevity of them.

Protecting you and your bike for trail riding is smart, it will save you money, and most likely a lot of pain. There are many more parts to add on to your bike to protect it, but these are the most common modifications that riders have.

You can click on the links or go to Amazon to view these.

Thanks for viewing, and good luck protecting yourself and your bike. Stay safe, and have fun riding.

-Tom Stark