How To Buy A Dirt Bike

Hey guys, if you know what bike you want to get but are not sure how or where to buy one, then pay attention to this. If you don’t know what bike to get, go check out my other post titled, “What Dirt Bike Should I Buy?”

Whether you don’t know where to find dirt bikes for sale, or if you what to do after you find one I will tell you how to do both and more. Although buying a bike may sound as simple as finding the right one and going to picking it up, the finding may not be as easy as you think, especially if you want a particular bike or deal on it.

Where To Search

There are many places you can find bikes for sale, including: eBay, classifieds, online stores, sitting in someones yard, and many more. But, the most common and best place to look for most areas of where you live is Craigslist.org. If you haven’t heard of it, it is a very simple to use and free classifieds for pretty much anything.Just click on the “motorcycle” link.

How To Buy One

Once you find the one that you want, the first thing you should do is contact the person who is selling the bike; preferably using a phone, but if they don’t have one then use email. Once you talk about the bike and find out what you want to know and if you still want it then ask when you can go look at it.If you to look at the bike and decide that you want it then make an offer if you haven’t already, an if he takes it then you got yourself a bike! Make sure that you get a bill of sale/receipt and the title for the bike if the person has it. If you don’t know what bike to buy yet, check out my articles, “What Dirt Bike Should I Buy?” and “What Dirt Bike To Buy For My Kid?

Good luck buying a bike!

-Tom Stark

 

How To Prepare For A Motocross Race

Physically

Before you go to a race you must first be a physical shape. This means that you should be able to at least complete the required laps without slowing down or getting lazy. By doing that you must be exercising and working out almost everyday. This doesn’t mean it has to be intense training, but it does require some effort. A good workout would be going for a long or fast bike ride that requires more strength and gets your heart pumping faster. Swimming is also great because it works every muscle in the body. Running helps a lot too if you have the time to do that. And of course, there is always riding your dirt bike that will help. The more you ride that the longer you should be able to last during a moto. Practicing in the heat can be difficult, but it will be an advantage in those longer motos when the heat starts getting to the riders. Working out is good, but if you it too much to the point that you are sore for more than a day after doing so and continue to work-out, then it does not help you. In fact, it’s bad for you because you don’t let your muscles heal from working before. So I suggest that you find a good routine that gets you working harder, such as going to a gym if you have the time, running, swimming, or riding your bike.

Mentally

Now many people don’t realize it, but being mentally strong for a race is just about as important as being physically strong. You have to have confidence in yourself to race at your full potential. Getting nervous right before the race is a very common thing for pretty much every racer, but that’s because we are all human. You must be able to focus and block out all other things before the gate drops. If you are thinking about what’s going to happen, what you’re going to eat after the race, or whose in the stands watching, then those are going to distract the entire race if you can’t get them out of your head. The goal for me is to not think about anything except what to do when the gate drops. My mind should be on the hole-shot and getting the that first corner ahead of everyone else. If you are both physically and mentally strong, then you are more than likely a step ahead of your competitors. Good luck, and have fun racing!

-Tom Stark

 

How To Adjust Suspension On A Dirt Bike

How To Adjust Your Dirt Bike’s Suspension

Here’s a quick tip on how to adjust the suspension on your dirt bike if it has adjustable forks or shocks. The purpose of adjusting it is to make the suspension perform at its best on certain types of terrain or size/shape of obstacles. The faster you go, the stiffer you’ll want your suspension to be. If you are a trail riding, then you will want it to be softer than it would normally be for riding on a motocross track.

.

Front Suspension/Forks

There are two things you can do to the forks without changing your springs, and these are adjusting the compression and rebound speed. As seen in the picture above, number one shows where the clickers are for adjusting the rebound on the bike, and number two shows where the clickers for changing the compression speed on the forks are. To slow down/stiffen either the compression or rebound on the forks, you will want to turn the clickers in/clockwise with a screwdriver. You will hear a “click” about every half turn, and all the way in is about 15 clicks for most bikes. You do the same thing for speeding up/softening the compression and rebound, but instead of turning the clicker in you will turn it out/counter-clockwise.

Rear Suspension/Shock

It’s basically the same routine for adjusting the shock, but the clickers aren’t in the same spots. Number three shows where the rebound clicker is on the shock, and number four is where the compression clicker is. The shock is usually around fifteen clicks also.

Setting it up for your style

If your bike still has stock suspension and it’s not extremely worn out, then the stock springs are usually set up for about a 130-165lb rider for motocross. If you weigh more than that, you’ll want stiffer springs, but if you weigh less than that then you’ll want softer springs. Another pointer when you’re adjusting you clickers is that you want the forks to be equally adjusted. What I mean by that is when you adjust the right side of the forks compression or rebound, then you will want the left side to be the same, otherwise it might not feel right or be as consistent. This does not mean that you have to have the compression adjusted the same as the rebound for either the forks or the shock. I usually keep them the same because I am not the fastest rider and tiny adjustments like that aren’t really noticeable for me. If you are picky about your suspension then you make little changes by having different combination settings (check out the Adjusting Your Spring Rate article for more tips on suspension). If you have any questions, feel free to comment. Thanks for viewing, and good luck!

-Tom Stark