How To Buy A Dirt Bike

Hey guys, if you know what bike you want to get but are not sure how or where to buy one, then pay attention to this. If you don’t know what bike to get, go check out my other post titled, “What Dirt Bike Should I Buy?”

Whether you don’t know where to find dirt bikes for sale, or if you what to do after you find one I will tell you how to do both and more. Although buying a bike may sound as simple as finding the right one and going to picking it up, the finding may not be as easy as you think, especially if you want a particular bike or deal on it.

Where To Search

There are many places you can find bikes for sale, including: eBay, classifieds, online stores, sitting in someones yard, and many more. But, the most common and best place to look for most areas of where you live is Craigslist.org. If you haven’t heard of it, it is a very simple to use and free classifieds for pretty much anything.Just click on the “motorcycle” link.

How To Buy One

Once you find the one that you want, the first thing you should do is contact the person who is selling the bike; preferably using a phone, but if they don’t have one then use email. Once you talk about the bike and find out what you want to know and if you still want it then ask when you can go look at it.If you to look at the bike and decide that you want it then make an offer if you haven’t already, an if he takes it then you got yourself a bike! Make sure that you get a bill of sale/receipt and the title for the bike if the person has it. If you don’t know what bike to buy yet, check out my articles, “What Dirt Bike Should I Buy?” and “What Dirt Bike To Buy For My Kid?

Good luck buying a bike!

-Tom Stark

 

What Dirt Bike Should I buy?


One of the most common questions I hear when people start getting interested in dirt bikes is, “What dirt bike should I buy?” This is a very good question, but the answer can vary greatly. The decision doesn’t necessarily depend on your age, although you don’t really want to stick a 6 year old on a big 450cc motocross bike. These are the main deciding factors on which bike you should buy.

Two or Four stroke?

The first question that I would ask is, “Do you want a two or four stroke?” It is important to some people because they might have grown up on one or the other and only want that specific stroke.

Age

Now like I said before, age does not matter as much, but it does matter a little bit more if you are a kid. Riders from 3-5 will probably want to start out on a 50cc. All of the name brand companies make a 50cc bike. Riders older than 15 will usually start riding full-size bikes.

Riding Purposes

The next big question would be, “What kind of riding are you going to do?” Will it be motocross, trail-riding, desert, dual-sport, or a little of everything? This is the fork in the road where you pick the type of dirt bike you want to ride.

Motocross

If you are going to be riding motocross most of the time, then you have several options. For big bikes you can choose a 125cc two-stroke, 250cc two or four-stroke, or a 450cc four-stroke. If you are a beginner in motocross then the smaller bike is always going to be better, and if you want to learn the basic techniques and good riding skills then I suggest a 125cc two-stroke motocross bike. These are the best training bikes because they teach you how to ride a bike faster, smoother, and they require more skill to ride fast. Intermediates will usually choose 250cc bikes, and expert riders will often choose the 450cc four-stroke, but that’s not always the case.

Trail Riding

Enduro

There are many bikes that are great for trail riding. All of the name brand companies have four-stroke trail bikes that are usually 250cc and 450cc. Kawasaki, KTM, and other European companies have two-stroke trail bikes that range from 125cc to 300cc+. If you aren’t going to be doing night riding and are a beginning rider, Honda has a great line of small-bore four-stroke trail bikes. They have a CRF100F, 150F, 230F(which is rumored to be discontinued soon), and then there is the liquid-cooled CRF250F enduro with lights that is similar to a motocross bike. KTM has 125, 200, 250, and 300cc two-stroke trail bikes that are all great and have excellent power. If you want to be a better rider and have a little more fun then a two-stroke would be a great choice, but if you want a full-size four-stroke trail bike then a 250cc would be a good bike too, because they have plenty of power and are able to be street legal.

Dual-sport

Supermoto on WR250X

Like I mentioned before the 250cc and the 450cc are capable of being street legal(You can also get a two-stroke legal for the street, but it might be a little more difficult). They are both great bikes, but a novice rider should start out on the smaller bike. Every name-brand company has a 250cc liquid-cooled four-stroke bike and are all comparable. Suzuki has a DRZ400 which is more street-oriented with a few more options than the other bikes. Honda has the XR250R, 400R, and 650R/L that can be street legal, but are also great off-road. I wouldn’t suggest getting the big 400, 450, or 650cc bikes if you are new to riding because they have a lot of power and torque.

Desert

Riding In The Desert

Desert riding may not be common to most riders, but out in Phoenix, California, and other desert areas, riders go out and ride there all of the time. The bigger the engine, the easier it will be to get through the sand. The Honda XR650 is a very good bike if you are a better rider and like to go on trips to the desert because of all the torque it has. The smallest bike that you would want out there is a 125cc two-stroke, otherwise the sand will just eat you up.

Choosing the right dirt bike can be tough. There are many bikes to choose from, so make sure you pick the right bike. But that doesn’t mean that you can only buy one. Another way to find out what bike you want is to try out some friends bikes and see if you like it or not, and the more bikes that you try the better you will know what you want. If you find out what you like before you buy one then you are on track to getting a bike that fits your needs. Thanks for viewing, and remember to check back soon for my new post titled, “How To Buy a Dirt Bike“.

Browse a selection of used bikes and cars at www.exchangeandmart.co.uk

If you have any questions, feel free to ask, because there is more detail that I can go into about this subject. Thanks

-Tom Stark

 

How To Prepare For A Motocross Race

Physically

Before you go to a race you must first be a physical shape. This means that you should be able to at least complete the required laps without slowing down or getting lazy. By doing that you must be exercising and working out almost everyday. This doesn’t mean it has to be intense training, but it does require some effort. A good workout would be going for a long or fast bike ride that requires more strength and gets your heart pumping faster. Swimming is also great because it works every muscle in the body. Running helps a lot too if you have the time to do that. And of course, there is always riding your dirt bike that will help. The more you ride that the longer you should be able to last during a moto. Practicing in the heat can be difficult, but it will be an advantage in those longer motos when the heat starts getting to the riders. Working out is good, but if you it too much to the point that you are sore for more than a day after doing so and continue to work-out, then it does not help you. In fact, it’s bad for you because you don’t let your muscles heal from working before. So I suggest that you find a good routine that gets you working harder, such as going to a gym if you have the time, running, swimming, or riding your bike.

Mentally

Now many people don’t realize it, but being mentally strong for a race is just about as important as being physically strong. You have to have confidence in yourself to race at your full potential. Getting nervous right before the race is a very common thing for pretty much every racer, but that’s because we are all human. You must be able to focus and block out all other things before the gate drops. If you are thinking about what’s going to happen, what you’re going to eat after the race, or whose in the stands watching, then those are going to distract the entire race if you can’t get them out of your head. The goal for me is to not think about anything except what to do when the gate drops. My mind should be on the hole-shot and getting the that first corner ahead of everyone else. If you are both physically and mentally strong, then you are more than likely a step ahead of your competitors. Good luck, and have fun racing!

-Tom Stark

 

How To Adjust Suspension On A Dirt Bike

How To Adjust Your Dirt Bike’s Suspension

Here’s a quick tip on how to adjust the suspension on your dirt bike if it has adjustable forks or shocks. The purpose of adjusting it is to make the suspension perform at its best on certain types of terrain or size/shape of obstacles. The faster you go, the stiffer you’ll want your suspension to be. If you are a trail riding, then you will want it to be softer than it would normally be for riding on a motocross track.

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Front Suspension/Forks

There are two things you can do to the forks without changing your springs, and these are adjusting the compression and rebound speed. As seen in the picture above, number one shows where the clickers are for adjusting the rebound on the bike, and number two shows where the clickers for changing the compression speed on the forks are. To slow down/stiffen either the compression or rebound on the forks, you will want to turn the clickers in/clockwise with a screwdriver. You will hear a “click” about every half turn, and all the way in is about 15 clicks for most bikes. You do the same thing for speeding up/softening the compression and rebound, but instead of turning the clicker in you will turn it out/counter-clockwise.

Rear Suspension/Shock

It’s basically the same routine for adjusting the shock, but the clickers aren’t in the same spots. Number three shows where the rebound clicker is on the shock, and number four is where the compression clicker is. The shock is usually around fifteen clicks also.

Setting it up for your style

If your bike still has stock suspension and it’s not extremely worn out, then the stock springs are usually set up for about a 130-165lb rider for motocross. If you weigh more than that, you’ll want stiffer springs, but if you weigh less than that then you’ll want softer springs. Another pointer when you’re adjusting you clickers is that you want the forks to be equally adjusted. What I mean by that is when you adjust the right side of the forks compression or rebound, then you will want the left side to be the same, otherwise it might not feel right or be as consistent. This does not mean that you have to have the compression adjusted the same as the rebound for either the forks or the shock. I usually keep them the same because I am not the fastest rider and tiny adjustments like that aren’t really noticeable for me. If you are picky about your suspension then you make little changes by having different combination settings (check out the Adjusting Your Spring Rate article for more tips on suspension). If you have any questions, feel free to comment. Thanks for viewing, and good luck!

-Tom Stark

 

2002 Honda CR125R Review

For those of you dirt bikers that would like to know a little bit about the Honda CR125, tune in to this post as I will give you a review of the bike. Although it is a 2002, not much changed since 2007 except that the motor was modified a little bit in 2005. So this should be pretty accurate to the newer models as well because Honda pretty gave up on their two-strokes once they unleashed the thumpers (four-strokes).

2002 Honda CR125R

 

Comfort

First off, I wanted to mention the comfort level on this bike is excellent. It’s probably the tallest bike I’ve ridden, seat height-wise, but it’s also one of the most comfortable motocross bikes I’ve ridden. It’s a little bit high for shorter riders like me(5’6”), but once you get on it it’s fine.

Suspension

For being stock suspension, I thought that it was great. Although I did not ride it extremely hard, it worked out very well for me. It soaked up all the bad landings, the braking bumps did not throw me around, and in the corners it wasn’t wanting to stand up. Since I am a lighter rider I thought the stock set-up would be a little on the stiff side, but I turned the compression and rebound clickers on the forks and shock all the way in and it was fine.

’02 CR125R

Engine

Now you may have heard that the Honda two-stroke enginessuck, they have no power, and they are the worst two-stroke ever. If you did not hear that, then disregard what I just said. Now, some of that is partly true. They don’t have the most powerful engine that’s for sure. But that’s not to say that they are slow. After all, it’s mainly the rider and not the bike, but we’re not here to talk about that. As for the power, yes the bottom-end is very weak. In fact, it’s so weak that it’s surprising that it even goes. Once you get it into the mid-range then it wakes up a little bit with okay power. The top-end hit isn’t the most powerful in it’s class either, but it’s nothing to be ashamed of. The motor also has the “Rattle of Death,” I have heard, and my CR had a rattle too, but you shouldn’t need to worry about that because pretty much all of them have it.

Handling

Handling on this bike is probably number one in it’s class. It can go through corners faster than you are able to! Wait, does that make sense?? Anyway, the handling is great much like the stock suspension. This is probably the biggest reason why people buy Honda’s, and I agree with them; it’s great!

Jetting

The jetting on Honda’s is one thing that scares people away. The two-strokes tend to eat up spark plugs quickly if the bike isn’t jetted for the correct temperature and altitude. I didn’t have any problems with mine because I bought it with it correctly jetted for where I ride. I am not an expert with carburetors, so I suggest bring it to a trusted mechanic and get it properly jetted. If you want to do it yourself then buy a manual for the bike if you don’t have one already and read it carefully. Don’t let the Honda jetting or rumors about it always being hungry scare you away. It’s a great bike. You just have to fix the carburetor right way. Unless of course you go with the PWK Air Striker like many people are doing.

What I Think of It…..

Overall this is a great package for new riders. It looks great, it rides great, and two-strokes are easier/cheaper on maintenance. This is a perfect bike for a new racer that doesn’t need much power and wants a good handling, stock bike. After the the jetting is fixed, you got a great bike in your hands. Make sure you maintain it, have fun, and keep those two-smokes rollin’!!

-Tom Stark

Riding the Honda CR125R: